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Cabbagetown murals brighten community

UNITING+A+COMMUNITY%3A+In+front+of+the+%E2%80%9CForward+Warriors%E2%80%9D+murals+lie+artistic+benches+made+from+squiggly+patterns%2C+each+a+different+color%2C+for+people+to+sit+and+take+in+the+art+around+them%3A+the+murals+and+nature+across+from+the+Esther+Peachy+Lefevre+Park.+The+child+and+canine-friendly+park+was+renovated+in+2013%2C+which+added+a+new+playground+and+dog+water+fountains.
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Cabbagetown murals brighten community

UNITING A COMMUNITY: In front of the “Forward Warriors” murals lie artistic benches made from squiggly patterns, each a different color, for people to sit and take in the art around them: the murals and nature across from the Esther Peachy Lefevre Park. The child and canine-friendly park was renovated in 2013, which added a new playground and dog water fountains.

UNITING A COMMUNITY: In front of the “Forward Warriors” murals lie artistic benches made from squiggly patterns, each a different color, for people to sit and take in the art around them: the murals and nature across from the Esther Peachy Lefevre Park. The child and canine-friendly park was renovated in 2013, which added a new playground and dog water fountains.

Lucy Bertsch

UNITING A COMMUNITY: In front of the “Forward Warriors” murals lie artistic benches made from squiggly patterns, each a different color, for people to sit and take in the art around them: the murals and nature across from the Esther Peachy Lefevre Park. The child and canine-friendly park was renovated in 2013, which added a new playground and dog water fountains.

Lucy Bertsch

Lucy Bertsch

UNITING A COMMUNITY: In front of the “Forward Warriors” murals lie artistic benches made from squiggly patterns, each a different color, for people to sit and take in the art around them: the murals and nature across from the Esther Peachy Lefevre Park. The child and canine-friendly park was renovated in 2013, which added a new playground and dog water fountains.

Lucy Bertsch, Writer

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The “Forward Warrior” wall is full of murals created by Atlanta artists that change annually. The founder, Peter Ferrari, set out to nine years ago to create a yearly event to Atlanta artists together in Cabbagetown on Wylie St.

“I was putting on a live painting event of my own at Melvin Gallery down the road, and my friend, Sam Parker, was put in charge of maintaining the walls in Cabbagetown, cleaning up graffiti, painting a few murals,” Ferrari said. “Eventually, he and I combined the two, and started a painting event that wound up covering the walls over the past few years.”

Ferrari is the curator who finds a neighborhood to host the event, then hand picks Atlanta artists to collaborate on the project. The exhibition takes place over a single weekend, so the artists only have 48 hours to finish their murals.

“The street art scene around Atlanta, in particular, has actually influenced my style a lot,” junior art student Sadie Mothershed said. “Last semester [in art class] we were assigned a project to re-create a piece of street art that we found around the city, and that really opened a lot of doors for me in regards to how I think about art and where you can get inspiration from.”

Esther Peachy Lefevre Park is across from the unique tiled murals, bringing together the community by broadcasting different cultures and communities through art.

“Artists using the city itself as a substrate is probably one of the most meaningful things they can do,” Mothershed said. “Putting up art where people can pass it every day makes it readily accessible to people who may not be able to see it in galleries or exhibitions where it would normally be.”

Mothershed also believes the murals bring different demographics and communities together by demonstrating what everyone has in common with each other.

“It’s a free, open-air art gallery for anyone to view,” Ferrari said. “It’s provided people interested in commissioning art a place to see and contact dozens of local artists. It helps artists try new concepts, scale up their work and potentially get it in front of thousands of people,” Ferrari said.

Ferrari added that the murals have allowed various communities to express their uniqueness.

“Murals have played a big role in new Atlanta art,” Ferrari said. “It has boosted the appeal of many neighborhoods, but has also brought Atlanta culture to light more.”

Snug in a corner just past the Krog Street bridge, the “Forward Warrior” statement pieces stand against the white walls for the community’s appreciation.

“I feel like outdoor art gives the community so much more life,” senior Esme Rice said. “It is so interesting how color can just make you so much happier.”

 

PALLOTTA 2014 (LAUREN PALLOTTA): Artist Lauren Pallotta Stumberg used huge paint rollers and a ladder to create pastel-crossed feet in October of 2014. “[This painting] was inspired by the Italian expression “Sempre in Gamba,” which literally means to be “in leg,” but colloquially translates to being capable,” Stumberg said. “For me, this piece was about feeling vulnerable but strong.”

AUSTIN BLUE: A spray-paint work by artist Austin Blue shows a woman with large earrings and uses vivid colors. Blue is also the curator of the Stacks Squares Mural Project next to the Forward Warrior murals. (@proper_blue)

 

BRING THE PAIN: The Artist Dubelyoo, co-founder of Art, Beats + Lyrics, creates clothing, prints and murals. His mural portrays a powerful African American woman. The Art, Beats + Lyrics mission statement is to “create a unique art experiences that help move the culture forward.”

 

GRIP PLYAZ: Grip Plyaz (Gus Cutty): The “Forward Warrior” murals bring together the community. This mural depicts rapper Grip Plyaz, who died from cancer in 2017. Cutty wrote on Instagram: “I learned of Grip Plyaz through mutual friends who were hit hard by the loss, and who brought up the idea of painting a mural for him shortly after his passing” (@guscutty).

 

UNITING A COMMUNITY: In front of the “Forward Warriors” murals lie artistic benches made from squiggly patterns, each a different color, for people to sit and take in the art around them: the murals and nature across from the Esther Peachy Lefevre Park. The child and canine-friendly park was renovated in 2013, which added a new playground and dog water fountains.

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About the Contributor
Lucy Bertsch, Writer

Lucy Bertsch is a first year staff member on the Southerner and a junior in the graduation class of 2020. She is excited to join the staff, hoping to add...

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Cabbagetown murals brighten community