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Articles By: Quinn Mulholland

Accelerated math classes behind curriculum strive to catch up

Accelerated math classes behind curriculum strive to catch up

For some freshmen and sophomores, the end of the year is proving to be more stressful than usual. That’s because two accelerated math classes, accelerated coordinate algebra/analytic geometry A and accelerated analytic geometry B/advanced algebra AB, are several units behind in their curriculum. Math teacher Linda Brasher said part of the reason the accelerated analytic geometry class is so behind […]

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Carstarphen selected as district’s next superintendent

Carstarphen selected as district’s next superintendent

Meria Carstarphen is not one to back down in the face of a challenge. When she arrived in Austin in 2009 as the new superintendent of the Austin Independent School District, one in four students did not graduate. Now, after five years at the helm of the district, during which the graduation rate rose by almost 10 percent, Carstarphen has […]

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Exclusive interview with likely APS Superintendent Meria Carstarphen

Exclusive interview with likely APS Superintendent Meria Carstarphen

Southerner editor Quinn Mulholland spoke with Dr. Meria Carstarphen, the sole finalist to be the district’s next superintendent, after a community open house at Grady in which she met members of the community. Here is what Carstarphen said: On her biggest priorities: “There are a few, depending on where we are by the time everything gets resolved. Principal leadership is really […]

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Some see privatization as underlying motivation in school choice movement

Some see privatization as underlying motivation in school choice movement

With the tumult surrounding legislation on the Common Core State Standards and gun rights, the 2014 legislative session got plenty of attention from stakeholders and the media. Several important bills related to charter schools, however, largely escaped the spotlight. In the debate over these bills, a fundamental dispute at the heart of the school choice movement was revealed: whether a […]

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Say cheese: quest yields wide variety of cheese dips

Say cheese: quest yields wide variety of cheese dips

Spring Break is just around the corner, and what better way to spend yours than lounging poolside, getting your tan on and eating chips and queso? With that in mind, we decided to scour Atlanta for its best queso, inspecting some of Grady students’ usual haunts and some locations whose queso is not as well known. Our journey began at […]

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Sprawl shares blame

Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. will go down in history as the day that two inches of snow completely shut down Atlanta, the 11th-largest metropolitan region in America. But what became known as “SnowJam 2014” showed us more about Atlanta than the obvious facts that the city needs to update its emergency weather alert apparatus. It also revealed the latent consequences of the racial division that […]

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APS Board member: personnel changes a “gut-wrenching process”

APS Board member: personnel changes a “gut-wrenching process”

Grady’s APS Board representative Matt Westmoreland sent The Southerner an open letter addressed to the community regarding Dr. Murray’s removal: Dear Grady High Community, The past several days have been extremely difficult for all of us. Last week’s news that Grady will have new leadership next year came as a shock to many. As someone who graduated from Grady eight years ago […]

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Jackson renovated in midst of transforming cluster

Jackson renovated in midst of transforming cluster

When she first set foot in the new Maynard Jackson High School on Jan. 3, new APS Board member Leslie Grant was blown away. “It really is phenomenal,” Grant said. The $48.3 million renovation includes a new media center, a rooftop garden and a new football field and track. Additionally, every room in the new building has some source of […]

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As for-profit companies enter public education, some see conflict of interest

As for-profit companies enter public education, some see conflict of interest

Public education has historically been seen as separate from the private sector. However, as more and more educational management organizations, which are for-profit entities, enter the business of operating charter schools, the line between the two institutions is becoming increasingly blurred. During the 2011-2012 school year, seven educational management organizations operated at least one charter school in Georgia. Jarod Apperson, […]

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Thoroughly excessive

Ten dollars. With 42 percent of our school dependent upon free or reduced lunch, we still charge $10 to see a Grady theater production. Grady’s theater program aims to encourage everyone to come enjoy its musicals and plays, but the reality is that many students can’t afford to pay so much to see a performance. Three-fourths of our editorial board were involved with […]

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